Bettors Beware: Apex Sportsbook Is Back Online

Even if you weren’t among the Apex clientele robbed of your winnings, you’ve probably heard of this scam sportsbook and been warned to stay away. Even if you hadn’t heard and had tried to visit the site, [http://www.apexsportsbook.com], a month ago would have been shown a message informing you that the host had suspended their account. Unfortunately, that host was one bill Apex did pay, and they are now back online and redirecting traffic to another scam operation: Bet33.com. Bettors beware; Apex Sportsbook and Bet33 are notorious scam operations that have jilted hundreds of bettors out of their winnings.

Apex closed its doors in June of 2004 after owner Robbie McPhail made off with a large client database and refused to pay over a hundred thousand in winnings to players. McPhail has remained active during the interim with one shady enterprise or another. But the old maxim “wherever you go, there you are” holds true for McPhail. The clean slate he was no doubt hoping for in opening Bet33.com — a sportsbook he created by transferring his losing account client base from Apex — never materialized. Industry watchdogs quickly realized that McPhail was passing himself off as “Zach” and claiming the sportsbook had been in operation for over 5 years. McPhail has also been scamming unwitting bettors with BetLasPalmas, a scam sportsbook sullying the good name of the original and respected Las Palmas sportsbook. Initially, BetLasPalmas was an affiliate site McPhail created to direct traffic to Las Palmas. But in the year after Apex closed it’s doors and he opened Bet33, he reorganized BetLasPalmas to operate as a sportsbook as well, covering it with a unique skin operating over the Bet33 software.

While McPhail’s work as an affiliate may have been harmless, it’s his attempts at operating his own gaming sites that have earned him such an infamous reputation, hurt the image of the industry, and scammed hundreds of trusting depositors. McPhail originally got his start in the gaming industry as an affiliate, sending traffic to legitimate sportsbooks. Quickly realizing the opportunity the fledgling industry presented, he decided the big money was in owning the betting operation itself and so opened Apex. But it was soon obvious that he was in far above his head. McPhail had no idea how to operate his own business, much less how to balance the risk associated with owning a gambling operation. So when he shut down Apex, he reverted to his original model and continued to use the domain as a gambling portal, directing traffic through affiliate links to various legitimate gaming sites.

From affiliate to sportsbook owner to affiliate and back again. Over the course of the last three years McPhail has consistently demonstrated an absence of accountability to the gaming public and the industry as a whole. It’s this type of scamming that gives the industry a black eye and adds fuel to attempts of U.S. legislators intent on banning online betting. Steer clear of these sites and bet smart.